From the head to the heart

Our reconciliation journey continues.

Red Cross pays our respects to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Custodians across this country.

We pay our respects to Elders, past, present and emerging.

We draw upon their wisdom, knowledge and leadership to guide us in changing hearts and minds.

A map of Australia over an Aboriginal flag background.
A dancer leads a group of people.

Contemporary performer Jeanette Fabila leads Red Cross people at the Jeays Steet Community Centre during Reconciliation Week 2018.

A dancer leads a group of people.

Contemporary performer Jeanette Fabila leads Red Cross people at the Jeays Steet Community Centre during Reconciliation Week 2018.

Our vision is for a unified nation built on dignity, safety and wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Where we learn about and acknowledge our shared history, its impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and its painful and confronting truths.

Where we take pride in the ancient histories, cultures and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. 

Where we listen to the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and enable them to implement their own solutions to issues that matter to them. 

To achieve this vision, we must walk alongside Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, communities, organisations and peak bodies.

Photo: Phillipe McLeod-Ebsworth celebrates NAIDOC week 2018 in Blacktown.

Realising that just that one word, Sorry, had such an impact and meaning to our healing was very profound and emotional.”
Andrea Lee
Walking across the Tasman Bridge with 20 thousand other people made me feel the power behind reconciliation and what it could mean if it was used properly.”
Lee Prouse
Sorry Day makes me realise reconciliation has a way to go, until we share the untold stories and the histories of our people.”
Natalie Little
It’s about listening to our stories, learning from what has happened, being accepted and making the right changes to build a better future.”
Stan Law
A six year old told me I didn’t look like I came from Australia because my skin is brown. I realised reconciliation starts at home.”
Kerry Klimm

This is our third Reconciliation Action Plan.

It is the map for our reconciliation journey. Where we’ve been, where we’re going, and the actions we will take to get there. 

It’s more than just a plan. It’s an invitation: to play your part and move reconciliation from the head to the heart.

Click to read the RAP

Imagine if …

each one of us did something practical and personal to promote understanding and respect.

Group of people at a young people's camp in a natural bush landscape in the late afternoon.

Young people from across the country attend the Welcome to My Country camp at Udialla Springs in WA.

Young people from across the country attend the Welcome to My Country camp at Udialla Springs in WA.

We connect the head and the heart.

We make reconciliation personal, get to know each other, deepen our learning about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, connection to land and identity, of customs and protocols, and celebrate achievements.

Kevin Doolan, Red Cross Regional Manager Tiwi Islands, and Regina Kantilla at the opening of the community centre on Tiwi Islands.

Kevin Doolan, Red Cross Regional Manager Tiwi Islands, and Regina Kantilla at the opening of the community centre on Tiwi Islands.

Kevin Doolan, Red Cross Regional Manager Tiwi Islands, and Regina Kantilla at the opening of the community centre on Tiwi Islands.

Building a new dreaming

Stephen with young leaders Stanley and Jobe.

Stephen, centre, with young leaders Stanley and Jobe.

Stephen, centre, with young leaders Stanley and Jobe.

How an Aboriginal community, and a young Sydney man with a laptop and microphone, fostered a generation of musicians, actors, dancers and film producers. Read their story »

We connect with others along the reconciliation journey.

Reconciliation is everyone’s business. We connect with others over our shared values and strengthen partnerships to amplify the impact of collective reconciliation actions.

Children playing a racing game in a red-earth landscape.

School holiday program, Kalgoorlie-Boulder.

School holiday program, Kalgoorlie-Boulder.

Who runs the world? Girls!

Nancy with students from a local high school.

Nancy, left, with students from a local high school.

Nancy, left, with students from a local high school.

From high teas with Elders to sports days and a homework centre, we’re partners in a program for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander girls, boosting confidence and school attendance. Read their story »

We create culturally safe places.

Continuous cultural learning will transform the way we think, feel and act. From this place of deeper understanding we will all be empowered to engage respectfully with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities, and confidently challenge and counter racism and prejudice.

A group of people at a water blessing ceremony in a river.

Malak Malak people conduct a water blessing ceremony with the Red Cross emergency services team in Nauiyu.

Malak Malak people conduct a water blessing ceremony with the Red Cross emergency services team in Nauiyu.

Because of Her We Can

Staff in Melbourne with posters and balloons ahead of NAIDOC March 2018.

Staff in Melbourne ready for NAIDOC March 2018.

Staff in Melbourne ready for NAIDOC March 2018.

Red Cross people celebrated the NAIDOC Week theme Because of Her We Can by telling the stories of the achievements and contribution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in their lives. Read their stories »

Listen.

Hear the true history of Australia from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Listen to First Nations’ voices and enable them to implement their own solutions.

A young man with a stripe of paint across his face holds a traditional tool.

Kobie Duncan performs at 2018 NAIDOC week celebrations in Blacktown.

Kobie Duncan performs at 2018 NAIDOC week celebrations in Blacktown.

Learn.

Understand more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, cultures, histories, practices and rights.

Join us in making reconciliation a movement from the heart.

Paula got her drivers license with support from the Red Cross learner driver program.

Paula got her drivers license with support from the Red Cross learner driver program.

Paula got her drivers license with support from the Red Cross learner driver program.

Lead.

By example and be passionate about, participate in and promote reconciliation in the community.

A woman speaking at a lecturn in public at an event.

Jody Broun, Australian Red Cross Director, NSW/ACT.

Jody Broun, Australian Red Cross Director, NSW/ACT.

Whether you’re taking your first step in the reconciliation journey or you’ve been walking the path for some time, there is action you can take to make reconciliation personal and meaningful. 

Make your own plantake some simple steps and do something from the heart for reconciliation.