Skip to main navigation Skip to main content

9 out of 10 Australians think we should be more kind every day

Thursday 12 March

A new Red Cross survey reveals that nearly nine out of ten Australians believe we should be more kind to each other every day.

The survey also finds that nine out of 10 people believe Australia would be a better place if everyone did at least one kind thing a day, such as helping friends, family members, work mates or others in their communities.
 
Judy Slatyer, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Red Cross said: “Our survey reveals that nearly all Australians believe that more compassion will make Australia a better place. Our research also finds that more than two-thirds (69%) of Australians would like to do more to help people facing tough times.

“Australians really care about the people in their communities. It is heartening that nearly three out of five of us (58%) would like to do more to help in our local communities. We need to create more opportunities to be involved as less than two out of five (39%) are actively engaged in their local community.

The study shows that Australia is becoming more compassionate: more Australians care about making their communities a better place than three years ago, when just under two out of three people (65%) want to do more to help vulnerable people in our society.

“While we’re still helping Australians affected by the bushfires, we know that there are many other people who need support. From those in our community who need a hand in tough times, to those newly arrived in Australia who need support settling into their new home, we’re there every day,” Ms Slatyer said.

“With your help, Red Cross is there for people, whether it’s helping someone who is struggling to make ends meet or supporting someone as they recover from a disaster,” added Ms Slatyer.

The Red Cross study comes as more than 8,500 people are out in their communities calling on their neighbours, checking in to say hello and helping with the annual Red Cross Calling activity.

“Our research confirms that Australians are very generous and kind. Nearly all Australians (95%) did at least one act of kindness towards others in the past year, such as donating clothes, spontaneous acts of kindness and donating money to those in need,” Ms Slatyer said.

The MevCorp survey was conducted on behalf of Red Cross with a nationally representative sample of 1,011 Australians over the age of 18 between 21st and 24th of February 2020.

Media queries: Antony Balmain, 0408 018 609 or abalmain@redcross.org.au

Key survey data

  • Australians say being kind to others is very important, with almost 9 in 10 (88%) believing that we should be more kind to others and that Australia would be a better place if we did this regularly or daily.
  • Looking at actions, not just good intentions, 95% of Australians did at least one act of kindness towards others in the past year, with donating clothes or goods topping the list (74%), followed by spontaneous acts of kindness (66%) and donating money to those in need (59%).
  • Just under 2 in five people (38%) volunteered their time to help others in the past year.
  • While nearly 3 out of five Australians (58%) would like to do more to help out in their local community, less than two in five (39%) are actively engaged in their local community.

Women a little more compassionate than men

  • Women have more compassionate attitudes and actions than men do across the board.Females are significantly more likely than males to have done certain acts of kindness in the past year, such as donated clothes or goods to charity (84% amongst females compared with 62% amongst males and a 73% average).
  • Females are more likely to do a spontaneous act of kindness for a friend, family member or colleague (73% amongst females vs 58% amongst males and 66% on average).
  • A higher number of women believe that Australia would be a better place if we all did one kind thing every day – for instance helping friends, family members, work mates or others in their communities on a daily basis: 91% of women compared with 84% of men.