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Frequently Asked Questions

  • Knowing you have taken action to feel better
  • Relief about sharing your thoughts/feelings
  • Finding new strategies and ways to cope
  • Gaining some perspective
  • Reducing your sense of loneliness
  • Building stronger relationships with friends and family
  • Preventing problems getting bigger
  • Learning to help others
  • You don’t have to deal with it all by yourself
  • Firstly, remember that it’s okay to ask for help.
  • Do it sooner rather than later – struggling on by yourself isn’t helpful.
  • Be clear about what you want - if you make the person your asking guess what you want, you’ll both be frustrated.
  • Reciprocity is important. At times when you are feeling well, try to offer help in return.
  • People who know you really well – they will know the signs and symptoms that show you’re struggling and can keep an eye out for them
  • People you trust and people you have positive relationships with.
  • People who have been helpful when you’ve had a problem before
  • People who make you feel good when you talk to them
  • People who understand the challenges you face
  • People who you already think of as ‘on your team’
    • Family members
    • Friends
    • A health professional or community worker that you have seen before
    • People you know who have also experience mental health concerns
  • Set a long term goal first but then break it down into smaller goals.
    • For example if the long-term goal is ‘dealing better with anxiety’ you might set short term goals of ‘meditating once a day’ or ‘exercising three times a week’.
  • Short term goals are really important and make progress manageable and measurable.
  • Set goals when you’re feeling well or call in your team for support to set goals.
  • Use the SMART goal acronym:
    • Specific – be really clear about what you want to achieve. For example: ‘Being happier’ is vague. ‘Dealing better with my anxiety (long-term goal), through healthy eating, regular exercise, meditation and socialising (short-term goals)’ is much clearer.
    • Measurable – add some numbers to your goals so you can know if you have achieved them. How many times a week or day would you like to do something?
    • Attainable – make sure what you’re aiming for is realistic – Sometimes just getting out of the house will be realistic. If everything seems to difficult call in the team to help you set something achievable.
    • Relevant – make sure it’s something you actually want – people who know you best can help you narrow down to what is relevant.
    • Timely – give yourself a realistic deadline, but remember to go easy on yourself if progress is slower than you’d like.
  • Share your goals with your team to help you stay accountable.
  • Keep moving, even if you don’t achieve a goal. Keep up the hard work and adjust your goals if needed.

Beyond Blue have more tips in their guide on goal setting and planning your day.