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Partners in health


Mel pulls out boxes of cereal from the cupboards at the Red Cross Breakfast Club at Coober Pedy Area School in outback South Australia. Her eight-year-old daughter Bethany eagerly helps, for soon a bus load of hungry children will arrive to devour their favourite breakfast foods.

Mel has been volunteering at the Breakfast Club for only a short while, but as the mum of a child at the school in a close-knit community, she has already noticed the difference your support is making.

"There has been a marked improvement in children's behaviour in class. Having full bellies helps them concentrate," says Mel.

You're helping give kids a healthy start in life

Thanks to loyal supporters like you, Red Cross Good Start Breakfast Clubs have been running in Australia for 23 years, and with approximately 190 Breakfast Clubs around the country, your help is vital in helping to keep this service going.

Weet-Bix recently featured six children on their cereal boxes from Red Cross Breakfast Clubs around Australia. Nan, who comes to the Cooper Pedy club every morning, is one of the smiling faces. Her grandmother Beverley says that Nan loves the Breakfast Club, and has been very excited to be featured.

The Coober Pedy Good Start Breakfast Club demonstrates how Red Cross supporters like you, together with students, teachers and community members, can improve the lives and opportunities of young children by giving them a healthy start not only to their school day, but to their lives.


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