Main Navigation


Connecting kids to culture


Feeling strong and deadly by connecting with culture: our work with young people in Broome.

Friday July 28, 2017

Share this article:
Xanthier, Linda and Angelina in the Dampier Peninsular. Photo: Leah Rakabundel
Xanthier, Linda and Angelina in the Dampier Peninsular. Photo: Leah Rakabundel
Our strength is listening to the young people and the community and developing solutions that they have highlighted.

From camping out bush and yarning with Elders to learning about local Yawaru culture, Red Cross is supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in Broome to feel strong and deadly.

Kimberley Manager and Nyikina Traditional Owner Loretta Bin Omar says the team works closely with the community to support the health and wellbeing of young Indigenous people in ways that range from healthy cooking workshops and sewing for young mums to cultural camps and basketball tournaments.

"Our strength is our high level of community engagement, listening to the young people and the community and developing programs and solutions that they have highlighted."

Here are just a few of these solutions.

Students in the year 8 class at Broome Girls Academy spent six weeks discussing health and wellbeing covering topics they were most interested in. They picked positive role models, emotions and nutrition and exercise as most important to them.

Young Warriors connects young, at-risk men with positive roles models who support them  by connecting with culture and promoting living healthy. This program is in partnership with Broome Youth and Families Hub, Headspace Broome and Nirrumbuk Aboriginal Corporation.

Youth crime rates can peak over Christmas, so the Broome Youth Cultural Holiday Program connects young men involved in the justice system with Elders and mentors to help them connect with culture and country and be involved in positive activities over the break.

Midnight Basketball Broome Tournament 2 isn't just a late night game. Participants talk about positive psychology, financial literacy, drug and alcohol awareness and other health issues. After a nutritious dinner, they're all dropped home safely by midnight.  The tournament is run by Midnight Basketball Australia and we support partner agencies and volunteers.

"In just the last six months we've worked with over 200 young Indigenous people in Broome delivering nearly 100 activities to support their needs," Loretta says.

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children's Day

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children's Day (4 August) is a day for Indigenous families to celebrate the strengths and culture of their children.  It's also an opportunity for all Australians to show their support for Indigenous children and learn why it's important for children to be connected to their community, culture and family.

The day is coordinated by SNAICC - National Voice for our Children. This year's theme is Value Our Rights, Respect Our Culture, Bring Us Home, recognising the 20th anniversary of the Bringing them Home Report, which exposed the extent and impact of removing Indigenous children from their families.

Find out more