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NAIDOC Week


NAIDOC Week stands for the National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee.

Its origins date back to the 1920s when Aboriginal groups aimed to increase awareness of the status and treatment of first Australians.

Today, NAIDOC Week is a national annual event celebrated by all Australians, Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, honouring the rich history and diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

We're marking NAIDOC Week by asking the question, 'How much do you know about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples?' We're encouraging people to learn more.

What makes first Australians deadly?

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are not only the world's oldest continuing culture they have contributed greatly to Australian society and are an integral part of our identity.

Here are some things you might not know the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

To find out how much you know about first Australians do our quick quiz.

Our deadly staff

During NAIDOC week, we are recognising staff, members and volunteers working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities to achieve their goals.

In particular, the more than 170 Indigenous people who make up 7.1% of our workforce.

This year we are honouring five Red Cross Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff and volunteers for their commitment to making a positive difference in the communities they work with.

Reconciliation in action

NAIDOC Week is a Key Action Area in our Reconciliation Action Plan 2015-2018 with symbolic and practical targets for reconciliation.

Staff, members and volunteers will be participating in a range of NAIDOC activities across Australia aimed at building our relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, communities and organisations.

We will focus on the importance of this year's NAIDOC theme "Songlines: The living narrative of our nation" and how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have maintained creation stories which celebrate their connection to land and sea through songs, art, dance and ceremony.

First Australians' connection to country is integral to health and wellbeing. Studies show that an Indigenous person's perception of their own or their community's health is closely intertwined with the health of their country.

We understand and support this connection to country in our work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Our Welcome to My Country camp brought 16 young people from across Australia to showcase their cultural and community strengths.

More information about NAIDOC Week can be found at naidoc.org.au