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Governor General launches Centenary book


On the eve of the Centenary of Red Cross in Australia, His Excellency the Governor General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove officially launched our Centenary book The Power of Humanity: 100 years of Red Cross in Australia.

Tuesday August 12, 2014

Australian Red Cross CEO Robert Tickner, Her Excellency Lady Cosgrove, Professor Melanie Oppenheimer and His Excellency the Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia, the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove at Canberra's Government House.

On the eve of the Centenary of Red Cross in Australia, His Excellency the Governor General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove officially launched our Centenary book The Power of Humanity: 100 years of Red Cross in Australia. As part of Australia's social history, the Governor General emphasised the unique role Red Cross has played in serving the nation for a century, at a special event at Canberra's Government House on Tuesday 12 August.

CEO Australian Red Cross Robert Tickner in his speech spoke of the dedication of millions of Australians in service to the nation and Red Cross' enduring humanitarian values over a century.

"The Australian Red Cross we know today has been shaped by adapting and responding to changing community needs. We continue to re-evaluate our everyday work: asking who most needs our help, and how we can best help them."

He went on to thank the countless people who have dedicated themselves to our humanitarian cause, from the first women volunteers to the contemporary Australians of today.

"On our 100th birthday, we reflect on our history of service and thank all those who answered the call to help change lives. It's thanks to them and to all our supporters today that we can continue to play a vital role in our nation's future."

Professor Melanie Oppenheimer was interviewed live from Government House onĀ ABC Radio National on 13 August, and spoke of the phenomenal history of volunteering which has made Red Cross the strong humanitarian organisation it is today.

One of those Red Cross people is ninety-one-year-old Mary Mundy who has been volunteering for Red Cross at Sydney's Parramatta tea rooms. Channel 7 news anchor Mark Ferguson interviewed Mary alongside Red Cross staff member Rachel Christie last week. Watch the interview.

In an interview with The West Australian, Professor Oppenheimer reflected on the reach and extent of Red Cross in WWI.

"One of the positives that came out of WWI is not only the Anzac legend but also Australian Red Cross because it is a voluntary organisation spread right across the country - in rural areas in particular - with a very strong female base," she said.

Book launches will also take place in Adelaide (Thursday 14 August) and Sydney (Friday 15 August) with other cities to follow in the coming weeks.

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